Simulated 2018-02-18
Description
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Integer fermentum eros lorem, tempor suscipit tellus ullamcorper vehicula. Interdum et malesuada fames ac ante ipsum primis in faucibus. This description come from the user.
Geometry
  • Input parameters
    Virtual wind tunnel
    Drag, lift
    Floor
    25 m/s
    Meter
    X: 0
    Y: 45.21345345
    Z: 30.13451345
    0.5
    1.0
    4.4 m
    13.6 m
    12 s
    0.50
    High (Validation)
  • Solver parameters
  • Drag coefficient  [Cd]
    0.35
    0.35
    COMPARE TO:
    The Cd value is not an absolute constant for a given body shape. It varies with the speed of airflow (or more generally with Reynolds number). Above comparison should be seen as general examples, and your specific result may not be directly comparable. Read more.
Side coefficient  [Cs]
0.20
Lift coefficient  [CL]
0.25
PlotDrag
Drag is the force acting on the object in the flow direction. This is a positive force that "pushes" the object along with the flow.

The plot in this section show the total aerodynamic forces (N) acting on the specified object over time (s). The time period corresponds to the time for the wind to pass over the object from one end to the other.
Drag
PlotSide force
The side force is perpendicular to both lift and drag. This force will "push" the object to the side.

The plot in this section show the total aerodynamic forces (N) acting on the specified object over time (s). The time period corresponds to the time for the wind to pass over the object from one end to the other.
Side force
PlotLift
The lift force acts on the direction of gravity and can be either positive or negative. A negative force "pushes" the object down towards the ground.

The plot in this section show the total aerodynamic forces (N) acting on the specified object over time (s). The time period corresponds to the time for the wind to pass over the object from one end to the other.
Lift
  • Simulation log
    Note from administrator
    2018-02-18 20:05
    Simulation failed
    2018-02-18 20:05
    Simulation canceled
    2018-02-18 20:05
    Simulation completed
    2018-02-18 20:05
    Post processing started
    2018-02-18 18:45
    Simulation started
    2018-02-18 10:21
    Pre-processing started
    2018-02-18 10:03
    Ready for simulation
    2018-02-16 08:56
    New simulation created
    2018-02-16 08:45
Time lapse
This section shows the wind speed (velocity) around the object with the help of a time lapse movie. A time lapse movie shows the wind flow in different locations, changing over time. For the front view, the camera is placed along the wind direction.
Front view (X)25 m/s
Time lapse
This section shows the wind speed (velocity) around the object with the help of a time lapse movie. A time lapse movie shows the wind flow in different locations, changing over time. For the side view, the camera is placed orthogonally (90°) to the wind direction.
Side view (Y)25 m/s
Time lapse
This section shows the wind speed (velocity) around the object with the help of a time lapse movie. A time lapse movie shows the wind flow in different locations, changing over time. For the top view, the camera is placed orthogonally (90°) to the bottom.
Top view (Z)25 m/s
  • How to interpret the color scale
    Colors
    Blue colors indicate that the wind speed is reduced, and red colors indicate that the wind speed is increased. The resulting wind speeds are compared to the input wind speed given in the set up.

    The flow is illustrated using two main colors, that are mapped to negative and positive values. Two main colors is typically used when a single channel of data is available (for example velocity, pressure or temperature). The color mapping is linear and relative to this specific simulation.
Snapshot
This section shows the average wind speed (velocity) around the object. The snapshot is captured at the last timestep of the simulation, and is visualized in slices. For the front view, the camera is placed along the wind direction.

A snapshot can provide detailed information about the instantaneous flow structures, that can not be obtained from a visualization of the average speed. From a design perspective, the instantaneous flow structures may be important with respect to time varying forces, or as noise sources, for example.
Front view (X)25 m/s
Snapshot
This section shows a snapshot of the wind speed (velocity) around the object. The snapshot is captured at the last timestep of the simulation, and is visualized in slices. For the side view, the camera is placed orthogonally (90°) to the wind direction.

A snapshot can provide detailed information about the instantaneous flow structures, that can not be obtained from a visualization of the average speed. From a design perspective, the instantaneous flow structures may be important with respect to time varying forces, or as noise sources, for example.
Side view (Y)25 m/s
Snapshot
This section shows a snapshot of the wind speed (velocity) around the object. The snapshot is captured at the last timestep of the simulation, and is visualized in slices. For the top view, the camera is placed orthogonally (90°) to the bottom.

A snapshot can provide detailed information about the instantaneous flow structures, that can not be obtained from a visualization of the average speed. From a design perspective, the instantaneous flow structures may be important with respect to time varying forces, or as noise sources, for example.
Top view (Z)25 m/s
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Average
This section shows the average wind speed (velocity) around the object, and is visualized in slices. For the front view, the camera is placed along the wind direction.

The average is illustrating the most stable flow structures over time. This can be useful for design, but keep in mind that there are instantaneous flow structures that are not visible.
Front view (X)25 m/s
Average
This section shows the average wind speed (velocity) around the object, and is visualized in slices. For the side view, the camera is placed orthogonally (90°) to the wind direction.

The average is illustrating the most stable flow structures over time. This can be useful for design, but keep in mind that there are instantaneous flow structures that are not visible.
Side view (Y)25 m/s
Average
This section shows the average wind speed (velocity) around the object, and is visualized in slices. For the top view, the camera is placed orthogonally (90°) to the bottom.

The average is illustrating the most stable flow structures over time. This can be useful for design, but keep in mind that there are instantaneous flow structures that are not visible.
Top view (Z)25 m/s
  • Learn more about the science behind our simulations
    Finite Element Method
    The foundation of Ingrid Cloud is our CFD-framework, which uses the Finite Element Method (FEM) together with adaptive mesh refinement based on adjoint techniques and a posteriori error estimation. Since 2010, our technology has been regularly validated in benchmark workshops organized by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and by NASA. The team behind Adaptive Simulations has dedicated over 30 person-years of research, to solve and automate many typical problems regarding CFD.

    Read more...
AverageStreamlines
This section shows the average wind speed (velocity) around the object, and is visualized using streamlines. For the side view, the camera is placed orthogonally (90°) to the wind direction.

Streamlines indicate directions, followed by a wind particle of the flow.
Side view (Y)25 m/s
Time lapse
This section shows the pressure around the object with the help of a time lapse movie. A time lapse movie shows the pressure in different locations, changing over time. For the front view, the camera is placed along the wind direction.
Front view (x)25 m/s
Time lapse
This section shows the pressure around the object with the help of a time lapse movie. A time lapse movie shows the pressure in different locations, changing over time. For the side view, the camera is placed orthogonally (90°) to the wind direction.
Side view (y)25 m/s
Time lapse
This section shows the pressure around the object with the help of a time lapse movie. A time lapse movie shows the pressure in different locations, changing over time. For the top view, the camera is placed orthogonally (90°) to the bottom.
Top view (z)25 m/s
  • How to interpret the color scale
    Colors
    Blue colors indicate that the wind speed is reduced, and red colors indicate that the wind speed is increased. The resulting wind speeds are compared to the input wind speed given in the set up.

    The flow is illustrated using two main colors, that are mapped to negative and positive values. Two main colors is typically used when a single channel of data is available (for example velocity, pressure or temperature). The color mapping is linear and relative to this specific simulation.
Snapshot
This section shows the pressure around the object. The snapshot is captured at the last timestep of the simulation, and is visualized in slices. For the front view, the camera is placed along the wind direction.

A snapshot can provide detailed information about the instantaneous flow structures, that can not be obtained from a visualization of the average flow structures. From a design perspective, the instantaneous flow structures may be important with respect to time varying forces, or as noise sources, for example.
Front view (x)25 m/s
Snapshot
This section shows the pressure around the object. The snapshot is captured at the last timestep of the simulation, and is visualized in slices. For the side view, the camera is placed orthogonally (90°) to the wind direction.

A snapshot can provide detailed information about the instantaneous flow structures, that can not be obtained from a visualization of the average flow structures. From a design perspective, the instantaneous flow structures may be important with respect to time varying forces, or as noise sources, for example.
Side view (y)25 m/s
Snapshot
This section shows the pressure around the object. The snapshot is captured at the last timestep of the simulation, and is visualized in slices. For the top view, the camera is placed orthogonally (90°) to the bottom.

A snapshot can provide detailed information about the instantaneous flow structures, that can not be obtained from a visualization of the average flow structures. From a design perspective, the instantaneous flow structures may be important with respect to time varying forces, or as noise sources, for example.
Top view (z)25 m/s
  • Need help to interpret report images?
    Get help from a CFD expert
    We offer extended help and analyzes for our automatic reports. If you would like to know more how to use our expertise, please feel free to contact us
Average
This section shows the average pressure around the object, and is visualized in slices. For the front view, the camera is placed along the wind direction.

The average is illustrating the most stable flow structures over time. This can be useful for design, but keep in mind that there are instantaneous flow structures that are not visible.
Front view (x)25 m/s
Average
This section shows the average pressure around the object, and is visualized in slices. For the side view, the camera is placed orthogonally (90°) to the wind direction.

The average is illustrating the most stable flow structures over time. This can be useful for design, but keep in mind that there are instantaneous flow structures that are not visible.
Side view (y)25 m/s
Average
This section shows the average pressure around the object, and is visualized in slices. For the top view, the camera is placed orthogonally (90°) to the bottom.

The average is illustrating the most stable flow structures over time. This can be useful for design, but keep in mind that there are instantaneous flow structures that are not visible.
Top view (z)25 m/s
Computational mesh
The images in this section show the tetrahedral mesh in cross sections perpendicular to the axis. Each vertex in the mesh can be thought of as a sampling point, where the flow is evaluated. Our adaptive mesh refinement method is capable of identifying regions of the flow requiring higher resolution, depending on the quantity of interest specified in the creation of the simulation, and the residual (the sum of all local errors). Tetrahedra in these regions are subdivided into smaller tetrahedra, increasing the resolution and decreasing the local error. This subdivision continues until the error is sufficiently small throughout the entire domain. This figure shows the sequence of adaptive mesh refinements from the front (X).
Front view (X)
Computational mesh
The images in this section show the tetrahedral mesh in cross sections perpendicular to the axis. Each vertex in the mesh can be thought of as a sampling point, where the flow is evaluated. Our adaptive mesh refinement method is capable of identifying regions of the flow requiring higher resolution, depending on the quantity of interest specified in the creation of the simulation, and the residual (the sum of all local errors). Tetrahedra in these regions are subdivided into smaller tetrahedra, increasing the resolution and decreasing the local error. This subdivision continues until the error is sufficiently small throughout the entire domain. This figure shows the sequence of adaptive mesh refinements from the side (Y).
Side view (Y)
Computational mesh
The images in this section show the tetrahedral mesh in cross sections perpendicular to the axis. Each vertex in the mesh can be thought of as a sampling point, where the flow is evaluated. Our adaptive mesh refinement method is capable of identifying regions of the flow requiring higher resolution, depending on the quantity of interest specified in the creation of the simulation, and the residual (the sum of all local errors). Tetrahedra in these regions are subdivided into smaller tetrahedra, increasing the resolution and decreasing the local error. This subdivision continues until the error is sufficiently small throughout the entire domain. This figure shows the sequence of adaptive mesh refinements from the top (Z).
Top view (Z)
Raw dataSnapshot
Download instantaneous raw data (VTU) for the simulation. You can Use open source software like ParaView, to open and customize the visualization.
Raw dataAverage
Download average raw data (VTU) for the simulation. You can Use open source software like ParaView, to open and customize the visualization.

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